I’ve been working on this image for some time now and will still have a great number of hours to completion.  It’s a mirror image flipped vertically and  will end up around 48″ across and 24+ high.  We are hoping to make it a piece of wall art at our “Ironworks Cabin” in the near future.  Next week we are going to Pomona Car Swap meet and will be looking or some type of automotive window framing from an old front or back window that will size right to become the framing for the picture.

The original is a daytime image that has been turned to sepia using Photoshop plus altered in many different ways as well.  I’m cleaning up the images borders from the night sky which started out as daylight plus am turning on lights throughout the image.  This is plenty of time-consuming minutia work that I hope is worth the effort in the end.

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How is wish that I could just do photography all the time and not do real work to earn a wage. I’ve several candle burning for future posts on the blog right now:

Several more catamaran Cruise in Caribbean days
Renaissance Festival from the Phoenix AZ area
Making and cooking homemade egg-noodles with Chicken
Osaka Grill Review
Rockabilly Reunion from Lake Havasue
….and much more.

I wish for more time to do the things I love! So in the meantime, I’ll show this work in progress and look forward to your comments.

Here at Ironworks, winter is approaching so it is time to finalize the garden before the first early frost.  First, I thought it would be important to give you the recipe and directions for planting an industrial garden.

Ingredients for a Bird / Bat-House:
1 Potty mouth wife
1 Testosterone infused husband
1 Kubota tractor
1 – 15′ tall Bat-House Pole
1 – 3′ deep hole
wedging blocks chopped into bits
Concrete

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Gus’ Garden Tools
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Typical Garden Tools

Directions:
As we are moving the pole from the truck to the planting area  Gus is driving the Kubota tractor and I’m guiding the heavy pole towards certain tragedy.  Gus, the Greek, is plowing along like Green Acres with the pole suspended from a lift that he built onto the end of the front bucket.

Cursing under my breath as we go I keep repeating the same phrase. Frack, oh frack. Don’t push me off the fracking wall.  Ffffffffrack. Thank you Battlestar Galactca for giving me a substitute word for the “F” word.

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Top with Bird House Base and Left-over Lift Loop
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Permanently Cemented in Place

Since, everything at ironworks weighs in like an elephant and with my 110 pound skinny assed frame it’s a challenge.  I’m a gutless woman when it comes to anything that gets my blood pumping from fear and adrenalin.  Gus and I planted the start for the birdhouse or aka bat-house depending on who takes it over first.  Its base is about 15 feet high and weighs at least 200 pounds.  The top plate will hold the little bird house once it is built and we plan to hang a couple of bat-houses or feeders off the side pole.  Yes, we do have bats!  With a lot of maneuvering and pole juggling we finally had the bat-house platform in place.  Then the chopped up concrete block bits were wedged about the hole so that it was vertically level.  Praying (me) that it didn’t topside, Gus ran off to mix up the cement and then concrete the pole into place.  To my disbelief it actually set and didn’t fall over.

Ingredients for a Jack-Hammer Flower Bed:
1 Nit-picky wife
1 Stubborn husband
3 vintage miners jack hammers
1 Vampire stake
4 Strategically placed large granite rocks

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Lovely Industrial Miner’s Jack Hammers
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Sunset View After Jack’s
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Sunset View without Jack’s

One would think that this Jack-Hammer flower garden would be delightful and yes I agree it should.  But not where the silly strong-headed Greek placed it. We’ve had several discussion about where he planted them and I think I’m still losing that battle.  I would have preferred that they not be in the sunset view as they are not my favorite pieces. They were staged right in the middle of my sunset view from where I’m having early evening cocktail hour on the patio. Who would have thought the land was so fertile right there for ironworks to be planted in that particular  spot.  So I thought a poll would be helpful in convincing the Greek to move to a more suiting location.  Blooming flipping frackin metal garden. What do ya’ think?

Ingredients for Sunrise Industrial Daisy Wheel:
1 Happy wife
1 Happy husband
1 3′ Industrial Pully
1 Industrial steel base

Directions:
Placement of the sunrise wheel on the raised platform must be precise and it was perfect!  It’s a pulley wheel about 3 feet in diameter and stands about 4 feet high.  It is balanced on a base that was planted into the ground about 2 feet deep.   As we were placing it on it’s platform it got away from us and almost ran me over.  I just dusted the dirt from my jeans, checked my vitals and we started over.  This was a close call, again,  as this particular flower was planted close to the edge of a 4 foot drop off.

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No poll needed here!  I love where the Greek planned for this gigantic flower to flourish.

Before, during and after building the kitchen for Iron Works.

Building and creating a compact two butt kitchen for the cabin was a challenging experience with multiple mind-boggling puzzles to solve.  The best laid plans can sometimes have minor quirks and ours had several.  More importantly, though, every headache was worth the end result.

One of the most unusual obstacles centered around the stove and placement of the stove. First, image how to get a 36″ stove into the kitchen opening after the granite counters have been put into place when the opening is only 34″.   Two inches too small to just slide the oven or easily carry the oven to its final position.    To make sure that the stove fit into the final opening after the granite had been put down the installation was delayed.  It wasn’t put in place earlier because of  the possibility of scratch and dent if installed to early.  Luckily, after the granite contractors finished installing the granite, they helped Gus lift the stove over the counters and put it into place.   This also involved taking the stove out of it final place multiple times to grind off about 1/8″ of the counter so the stove would fit into place.  To top it off, the stove would not fit far enough to the back of the wall to allow for the dishwasher to open without hitting the oven handles.  With a little ingenuity, Gus cut out the drywall behind the stove so that it would slide back a couple more inches.  Finally, stove was installed and the dishwasher cleared the top oven handle.  The dishwasher still has to rest on the bottom door handle which is a little odd, but does work.

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Karen’s Two Butt Kitchen
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Steel Cabinet Frames in Oil Rubbed Bronze

The framework for the cabinets are not your typical wood type framing.  They are made entirely from steel that was cut and welded by Gus.  This was another fun experience.  Outside measures were taken as well as inside measures.  One cabinet came out lopsided when the outside measure was used on one side and the inside measure on another.  Poor Gus had to cut it back apart and start it over.  Just as most everything built for Iron Works, the cabinet frames where heavy and awkward.  They were built-in sections.  For example the upper cabinet to the right is one piece while the upper cabinet to the left is also one piece.  Very heavy and cumbersome to install.

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Rain Forest Brown Marble and Industrial Serving Bar

The counters are a Rain Forest Brown Marble.  Just above the counter in the foreground in an industrial metal serving bar that runs the entire length of the front counter.  It is held up by only three posts that are anchored to the ground.   The lighting in the kitchen is all from repurposed light shields that are white porcelain inside and forest green cover.  They were found while picking “American Pickers” style in South Dakota over a year before beginning the cabin. The back-splash runs the entire interior of the kitchen and is small 1″ copper squares that came in 12″ square sheets.  This give the kitchen a full richness of browns, bronze and golden colors.

The kitchen sink is one of the most unusual items in the kitchen.  The base is from an repurposed super heavy-duty 1940’s vintage industrial radial drill press factory table that was purchased from Urban Remains Chicago, an antique and architectural  artifacts company based in Chicago.   It was taken apart and repurposed again for our use.

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Sink Base Industrial Radial Drill Press

Plumbing the sink was a nightmare but it all came together.  The sink itself is hammered copper and has only one bowl.  While two bowls would have been better, we were working with a limited opening and depth. At the base, there is a door that opens to a small storage area for dish soap and other essentials.

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Finished Look of the Industrial Sink