Whenever I say to my husband, “I want to go out for Italian food” he says, “I don’t like Italian.” Well, last night I fed him Italian. He didn’t know it and he loved it. This is my version of a recipe for Cioppino Seafood Pot that is a fish stew that originated in San Francisco, California. It is an Italian-American dish, and is related to regional fish soups and stews of Italian cuisine.  There are many recipes using a variety of seafood and various degrees of tomato base.  You can add other fish such as cod, lobster, bay scallops, etc.  Make it how you enjoy it and serve with a crusty loaf of artisan bread.

Cioppino
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Rating: 5
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Servings Prep Time
2-3 people 15 minutes
Cook Time
30 minutes
Servings Prep Time
2-3 people 15 minutes
Cook Time
30 minutes
Cioppino
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Votes: 1
Rating: 5
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Print Recipe
Servings Prep Time
2-3 people 15 minutes
Cook Time
30 minutes
Servings Prep Time
2-3 people 15 minutes
Cook Time
30 minutes
Ingredients
Servings: people
Units:
Instructions
  1. Over medium low heat melt butter in a 6 quart stockpot, add onions, garlic and parsley. Cook slowly, stirring occasionally until onions are soft.
  2. Add tomatoes, chicken bone stock, bay leaf, basil, thyme, oregano, water and wine. Cover and let simmer 15 minutes.
  3. Stir in the crab sections, shrimp, scallops, and clams. Bring to a slow boil. Lower heat, cover and simmer 5 to 7 minutes until clams open.
  4. Serve in shallow bowl with crusty artisan bread and a glass of the white wine.
Recipe Notes

Cioppino is a fish stew that originated in San Francisco, California. It is an Italian-American dish, and is related to regional fish soups and stews of Italian cuisine.  There are many recipes using a variety of seafood and various degrees of tomato base.  You can add other fish such as cod, lobster, bay scallops, etc.  Make it how you enjoy it and serve with a crusty loaf of artisan bread.

Mom's Navy Bean Soup

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Servings
16 people

Servings
16 people

Mom's Navy Bean Soup

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Servings
16 people

Servings
16 people

Ingredients
THE NIGHT BEFORE:

COOKING DAY:


Servings: people

Units:

Instructions
  1. INSTRUCTIONS

    The night Before:

    Soak the beans in water that is at least 2" over the beans to soak and often the beans. This decreases the cooking time the next day.

  2. Cooking Day:

    Drain the water from the beans. Add fresh water to 1" over the beans. Then add chicken broth to bring the liquid to 2" over the beans. Add ham hocks or diced ham and start to cook in slow cooker on medium heat. In the meantime, slice/dice the carrots and celery then add to the cooker. Dice or mince 2 cloves of garlic and add to cooker. Make sure to cook most of the day in a slow cooker until reduced down and thickened.

  3. During the last 30 minutes to hour remove the ham hock bone and add any meat back to the pot. The add the thyme and parsley. Serve over fried potatoes.

I’m on a soup kick because my husband will not eat soup unless its clam chowder or French Onion soup.  At lunch is my chance to try something different.  I’m still using up that leftover turkey but didn’t want to make exactly the same soup.

Today I grilled up the vegetables on the indoor grill.  You could grill outdoors or sear in a hot skillet.  Cast iron would work nicely, or maybe sear in a wok.

Put about 3 cups turkey broth and as much turkey (substitute chicken) as you desire into a medium size saucepan.  Salt and pepper to taste.  Heat over medium heat.

Cook your vegetables on the grill.  
one small baby red sweet pepper
one small potato; peel then quarter
one-fourth onion; separate out the sections so they lay curve side down on the grill
one section of carrot about 5 inches long and 1/2 inch wide so that it stays on the grill

Cook until they get sear marks and begin to get tender. Cut potato into bite-size pieces and add to the broth.   Remove the top of the pepper and seeds.  Dice the onion and pepper and add to the soup.  Lastly cut the carrot on a diagonal about 1/8 inch thick and add to broth too.

The soup will cook for 20-30 minutes until the potatoes are completely tender.  As the potatoes cook they will absorb broth so make sure to watch and add more broth as necessary.  Mine cooked down so that it was a thickened broth.  Add as much broth as you desire.

I thought I had enough soup that I wouldn’t be able to eat it all, but NO and ate every last drop.  Though I did share a few bits with my Yorkie, Gismo.  She enjoyed the soup too.

I’m still on my healthy eating path to reaching several goals; better food menu for healthy eating, losing weight (a few more pounds) and exercising to have more muscle tone.  There it is.  The reason for coming up with this variety of Turkey Soup.  It’s the first time I’ve made it and didn’t use a recipe.   It was invented by thinking of other dishes I’ve made and how to adapt them without rice or noodles.

This soup is an Asian version of Turkey Soup.  Normally I would add a ton of noodles and thicken with flour.  This time, I started with Turkey Stock that was from the roast turkey breast leftovers earlier this week.  For a single serving: start with 1 tablespoon olive oil in a small pan and bring to medium heat.  Add chopped onion, slivered carrot, zucchini slices and chopped baby bell peppers.  Sauté until tender.  Add potsticker sauce (hoisin sauce) and cornstarch sprinkled to thicken.  This could be used as a sauce over meat, but I used it to create a soup base.  Add turkey stock to fill the pan to as much soup as your desire.  Continue to add cornstarch until desired thickness.  Add chunks of cut up turkey and simmer until thickened and the cornstarch is cooked.  Season with salt and pepper to taste.  Pour into serving bowl and enjoy.  Or, if in a hurry, just eat from the pan. 😀

I love everything about Tuscany and this soup is a great reminder.  I found it on the Saveur Recipe website.  It has such a hearty appeal so I couldn’t resist to share it with all.

Maybe it was the crunchy bit of bread to the side or the bits of tomato and carrot popping up to the surface.  Can’t wait to give it a try.  If you beat me to it, let me know what you think.

Image by André Baranowski

2 cups dried cannellini beans, soaked overnight
2 medium carrots, roughly chopped
1 rib celery, roughly chopped
1⁄2 yellow onion, roughly chopped
3⁄4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
4 cloves garlic (3 minced, 1 halved)
10 oz. squash, such as butternut, peeled and cut into 1⁄2″ cubes(about 2 cups)
4 large kale leaves, preferably
 lacinato or cavalo nero, stemmed and chopped
1 medium waxy-style potato, peeled and cut into 1⁄2″ cubes
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
crushed fennel seeds
8 thick slices country-style bread

1. Drain beans and transfer to a 3-qt. saucepan along with half the carrots, the celery, the onions, and 5 cups water. Bring to a boil and reduce heat to low; simmer, covered, until beans are tender, 40–45 minutes. Set 3⁄4 cup beans aside; transfer the remaining beans and their cooking liquid to a blender and purée. Set puréed beans aside.

2. Heat 2 tbsp. oil in a 5-qt. pot over medium heat. Add minced garlic and cook, stirring often, until soft, about 3 minutes. Add reserved bean purée, along with the remaining carrots, the squash, kale, potato, and 1 cup water. Season with salt and pepper, bring to a boil, and reduce heat to medium-low; cook, covered, until the vegetables are tender, about 20 minutes. Stir in the crushed fennel seeds and reserved whole beans. Meanwhile, toast the bread and rub it with the cut end of the halved garlic clove. Drizzle each toast with 1 tbsp. oil. To serve, place 1 to 2 pieces toasted bread in the bottom of soup bowls and ladle soup over the top. Drizzle soup with remaining oil.

Credits:  Author Nancy Harmon Jenkins uses olive oil three ways in this version of the venerable Italian soup: for sautéing garlic, rubbing on the toasts that accompany the dish, and finishing the soup.