I will have some cherry tomatoes soon thanks to AeroGarden.  They are doing much better than the strawberries.  Only have two strawberry plants left… wahhhh…I think I may have killed them.  But the tomatoes area thriving.  Thanks, Dad, for your inspiration.  I loved that you always brought me tomatoes when you came to visit me.  I can still see in my mind how you would go into your garden and check your corn, tomatoes and sweet peas.  You never thought you could grow sweet peas and that was because your young trouble makers were eating them right off the vine.  I still love eating sweet peas to this day and remember fondly of you when I do.  But, today and forever your tomatoes will be my favorite!

One of my favorite things to do with Ms. T is to help her make her famous homemade noodles.  When she visited this spring we went up to the cabin and carted all the ingredients we needed to make Chicken and Homemade Noodles.  It’s  one of my most desired comfort foods and I also have it with leftover turkey during the holidays.  The recipe is from Ms. T’s family; Grandma Olga who was of German heritage. It is fun to think that this recipe has been passed on through multiple generations and I’m now sharing it with you.   I usually cheat when it comes to the noodles and buy fresh packaged linguini noodles and toss them in flour.  But, Ms. T showed me again how to make them and I have the evidence to prove it.

Ingredients:

2    Cups All-Purpose Flour
2   Teaspoons Salt
3    Egg Yolks
1    Whole Egg
1/4 to 1/2 Cup Water

Directions: Assemble all your ingredients and tools that you will need before beginning.  Place the flour and salt in a large mixing bowl and mix together.  Form a pocket hole in the flour to place the next few ingredients.  You may notice that many of the kitchen items are antiques such as the large mixing bowl.  I love antiques and have quite a few in use at the cabin including the mixing bowl, green glass measure cups and large green glass measure for water.

Place the eggs in the center of the pocket.  First place in the whole egg.  Then separate 3 eggs from yolks reserving the whites.  As you separate the yolk, place it in the pocket along with the first whole egg.

Next, add water a little at a time until the dough become firm and you are able to handle the dough.  Knead the dough for approximately 10 minutes.  Press your hands into a dough ball and flatten it.  Fold the flattened dough back into itself and press flat again, repeat for 10 minutes.   Whew…  you have to be able to get you hands into the work.  After kneading for 10 minutes, form a dough ball and cover with a light towel.  Let rest for 10 minutes.  You can now rest for a few minutes, too.

Cut the dough into four pieces and form individual balls.  Take one ball at a time, leaving the remaining balls covered with a towel or plastic wrap in the bowl.  Add a little flour to the top of the first ball and begin rolling the dough flat.  Turn over, add more flour if necessary and press with rolling-pin to continue flattening.  Repeat until you reach the desire thinness. The dough should be relatively thin.

We used a pasty cutter with multiple blades to cut the dough.  Take your time and take it slow when cutting.  You need to press fairly hard down on the cutter to make clean cuts.  You can also roll the thin dough up like a tube and then cut the roll  into individual slices with a knife if you prefer.  The difference is that you will not achieve uniform pieces of noodles when using the second method.  Place each individual noodle on a cookie rack and allow to dry for 2 hours.

All the while we were preparing the noodles, we started to cook a whole chicken.  Place cut up chicken in large stock pot.  Add water to cover.  Season with salt, onion powder (except for Mr. B.) and allow to simmer for several hours until tender and fully cooked.  After cooked, remove chicken from pot and refrigerate until cool to touch.  Retain broth to cook noodles later.  After chicken is cooled, remove skin and bone.  Cut into small bite size pieces. Add noodles to boiling chicken broth and cook until tender.  Add chicken.  Make it the ultimate indulgence.   Serve along with a simple green salad as you won’t need much more.

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Sprinkle with a little pepper and choice of spice blend for color.
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Simple Green Salad with chopped fresh tomatoes and snap peas.

Before, during and after building the kitchen for Iron Works.

Building and creating a compact two butt kitchen for the cabin was a challenging experience with multiple mind-boggling puzzles to solve.  The best laid plans can sometimes have minor quirks and ours had several.  More importantly, though, every headache was worth the end result.

One of the most unusual obstacles centered around the stove and placement of the stove. First, image how to get a 36″ stove into the kitchen opening after the granite counters have been put into place when the opening is only 34″.   Two inches too small to just slide the oven or easily carry the oven to its final position.    To make sure that the stove fit into the final opening after the granite had been put down the installation was delayed.  It wasn’t put in place earlier because of  the possibility of scratch and dent if installed to early.  Luckily, after the granite contractors finished installing the granite, they helped Gus lift the stove over the counters and put it into place.   This also involved taking the stove out of it final place multiple times to grind off about 1/8″ of the counter so the stove would fit into place.  To top it off, the stove would not fit far enough to the back of the wall to allow for the dishwasher to open without hitting the oven handles.  With a little ingenuity, Gus cut out the drywall behind the stove so that it would slide back a couple more inches.  Finally, stove was installed and the dishwasher cleared the top oven handle.  The dishwasher still has to rest on the bottom door handle which is a little odd, but does work.

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Karen’s Two Butt Kitchen
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Steel Cabinet Frames in Oil Rubbed Bronze

The framework for the cabinets are not your typical wood type framing.  They are made entirely from steel that was cut and welded by Gus.  This was another fun experience.  Outside measures were taken as well as inside measures.  One cabinet came out lopsided when the outside measure was used on one side and the inside measure on another.  Poor Gus had to cut it back apart and start it over.  Just as most everything built for Iron Works, the cabinet frames where heavy and awkward.  They were built-in sections.  For example the upper cabinet to the right is one piece while the upper cabinet to the left is also one piece.  Very heavy and cumbersome to install.

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Rain Forest Brown Marble and Industrial Serving Bar

The counters are a Rain Forest Brown Marble.  Just above the counter in the foreground in an industrial metal serving bar that runs the entire length of the front counter.  It is held up by only three posts that are anchored to the ground.   The lighting in the kitchen is all from repurposed light shields that are white porcelain inside and forest green cover.  They were found while picking “American Pickers” style in South Dakota over a year before beginning the cabin. The back-splash runs the entire interior of the kitchen and is small 1″ copper squares that came in 12″ square sheets.  This give the kitchen a full richness of browns, bronze and golden colors.

The kitchen sink is one of the most unusual items in the kitchen.  The base is from an repurposed super heavy-duty 1940’s vintage industrial radial drill press factory table that was purchased from Urban Remains Chicago, an antique and architectural  artifacts company based in Chicago.   It was taken apart and repurposed again for our use.

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Sink Base Industrial Radial Drill Press

Plumbing the sink was a nightmare but it all came together.  The sink itself is hammered copper and has only one bowl.  While two bowls would have been better, we were working with a limited opening and depth. At the base, there is a door that opens to a small storage area for dish soap and other essentials.

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Finished Look of the Industrial Sink

I’ve got to get me some of these! A Facebook friend sent me the link and I think it’s a great gift idea. Please keep in mind that this post is not an sponsored advert for the company or product. It looked like a fun gift idea for anyone who has a love of cooking and that me in a nutshell. I’m putting it on my Christmas list.

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Designs – Tervis Insulated Tumblers – Mugs – Water Bottles – Gifts.

I hope they have an apron, too!