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A Cabin Called Iron Works – Industrial Iron Garden

Here at Ironworks, winter is approaching so it is time to finalize the garden before the first early frost.  First, I thought it would be important to give you the recipe and directions for planting an industrial garden.

Ingredients for a Bird / Bat-House:
1 Potty mouth wife
1 Testosterone infused husband
1 Kubota tractor
1 – 15′ tall Bat-House Pole
1 – 3′ deep hole
wedging blocks chopped into bits
Concrete

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Gus’ Garden Tools
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Typical Garden Tools

Directions:
As we are moving the pole from the truck to the planting area  Gus is driving the Kubota tractor and I’m guiding the heavy pole towards certain tragedy.  Gus, the Greek, is plowing along like Green Acres with the pole suspended from a lift that he built onto the end of the front bucket.

Cursing under my breath as we go I keep repeating the same phrase. Frack, oh frack. Don’t push me off the fracking wall.  Ffffffffrack. Thank you Battlestar Galactca for giving me a substitute word for the “F” word.

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Top with Bird House Base and Left-over Lift Loop
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Permanently Cemented in Place

Since, everything at ironworks weighs in like an elephant and with my 110 pound skinny assed frame it’s a challenge.  I’m a gutless woman when it comes to anything that gets my blood pumping from fear and adrenalin.  Gus and I planted the start for the birdhouse or aka bat-house depending on who takes it over first.  Its base is about 15 feet high and weighs at least 200 pounds.  The top plate will hold the little bird house once it is built and we plan to hang a couple of bat-houses or feeders off the side pole.  Yes, we do have bats!  With a lot of maneuvering and pole juggling we finally had the bat-house platform in place.  Then the chopped up concrete block bits were wedged about the hole so that it was vertically level.  Praying (me) that it didn’t topside, Gus ran off to mix up the cement and then concrete the pole into place.  To my disbelief it actually set and didn’t fall over.

Ingredients for a Jack-Hammer Flower Bed:
1 Nit-picky wife
1 Stubborn husband
3 vintage miners jack hammers
1 Vampire stake
4 Strategically placed large granite rocks

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Lovely Industrial Miner’s Jack Hammers
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Sunset View After Jack’s
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Sunset View without Jack’s

One would think that this Jack-Hammer flower garden would be delightful and yes I agree it should.  But not where the silly strong-headed Greek placed it. We’ve had several discussion about where he planted them and I think I’m still losing that battle.  I would have preferred that they not be in the sunset view as they are not my favorite pieces. They were staged right in the middle of my sunset view from where I’m having early evening cocktail hour on the patio. Who would have thought the land was so fertile right there for ironworks to be planted in that particular  spot.  So I thought a poll would be helpful in convincing the Greek to move to a more suiting location.  Blooming flipping frackin metal garden. What do ya’ think?

Ingredients for Sunrise Industrial Daisy Wheel:
1 Happy wife
1 Happy husband
1 3′ Industrial Pully
1 Industrial steel base

Directions:
Placement of the sunrise wheel on the raised platform must be precise and it was perfect!  It’s a pulley wheel about 3 feet in diameter and stands about 4 feet high.  It is balanced on a base that was planted into the ground about 2 feet deep.   As we were placing it on it’s platform it got away from us and almost ran me over.  I just dusted the dirt from my jeans, checked my vitals and we started over.  This was a close call, again,  as this particular flower was planted close to the edge of a 4 foot drop off.

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No poll needed here!  I love where the Greek planned for this gigantic flower to flourish.

6 thoughts on “A Cabin Called Iron Works – Industrial Iron Garden

  1. Students are interested in using your typical garden tools image (shovel, rack, scissors,etc.) as part of the logo for the school’s garden club. Do you permit use of the image? Thanks.

    1. Your students are more than welcome to use my images for study.

    2. I do have to admit since I went back a looked, the typical garden tools is not my image. It was online so I don’t have permission to grant you permission on it. Any of the photographic content is okay to use. Sorry for confusing. You can probably google that image and ask the owner for permission.

  2. Students are interested in using your garden tools image as part of the logo for the school’s garden club. Do you permit use of the image? Thank you.

    1. Sorry it took me so long to reply. Please feel free to use the images for student projects.

  3. I must admit that it took a lot of prodding, a lot of badgering and a few closely moderated conversations but the splendid Greek did relent and moved the jack hammers to a new location. The are still visible from the front porch but not in direct line of the sunset view. He did it for me and not because I was such a pain in the behind. 😉

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